Courses

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  • Advanced Mandarin 1
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course focuses on reading, writing characters and Chinese composition. By the end of the year, students will be able to recognize 1000-1500 words, and possibly more. Students who are taking this course are from Chinese speaking community. Students will be trained at a higher level in reading and writing based on Taiwan Elementary Chinese Textbook Vol. 9, from Nanyi Publication. There are four units, and approximately 12 lessons included in this course. Other supplementary materials which will enhance students’ ability in understanding Chinese idioms and writing techniques are also implemented in this course. (Prerequisite: EMS Heritage Course Level 8 or teacher approval)
  • Advanced Mandarin 2
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course focuses on reading and writing characters. By the end of the year, students will be able to recognize 1500-2000 words, and possibly more. Students who are taking this course are from Chinese speaking community. Students will be trained in an advanced level reading and writing based on Taiwan Elementary Chinese Textbook Vol. 10, from Nanyi Publication. There are four units, and approximately 12 lessons included in this course. (Prerequisite: HS Advanced Mandarin 1 or teacher approval)
  • Advanced Writing Workshop
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E, M
    The primary aim of this course will be to encourage and develop the skills of students with a strong interest in creative writing. Over half of the class time will be devoted to writing; in addition, teacher-directed student conferences and class-led peer editing panels will help hone these writing skills. Students in this course must be intrinsically motivated to work on their writing. The students will also help to produce a literary journal. (Prerequisite: English 1)
  • Algebra 1
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    Algebra 1 strengthens the student’s understanding of arithmetic and develops his/her skills of translating verbal expressions into mathematical symbols, numerical expressions and open sentences. Topics of emphasis include solving equations, inequalities, multiplying and factoring polynomials, graphing linear equations and solving radical expressions.
  • Algebra 2
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    This course reviews Algebra 1 with increased emphasis on equations and inequalities, the real number system, functions, relations, graphs of polynomial functions and conic sections, polynomials and algebraic expressions, exponents and numerical computation, and quadratic relations. The content includes systems of equations in three variables, introduction to complex number systems, and study of trigonometric and circular functions. (Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry recommended)
  • AP Art History
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online This course is designed to provide college-level instruction in art history and prepare students for the AP exam in early May. This course is divided into two 18-week semesters, during which students examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. Students learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience.
  • AP Biology
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This college-level course is designed to prepare students for the College Board AP Biology Exam. The conceptual focus will be the four “Big Ideas” outlined by the College Board: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions. The College Board has also designated several “Science Practices” to be demonstrated by AP Biology students. Toward this end laboratory exercises will include student-directed and inquiry-based investigations emphasizing skills such as lab design, problem-solving, data interpretation, and effective reporting of results. This course requires at least as much out of class time as in class time. (Prerequisites: The student must have completed both Chemistry and Algebra II with a minimum grade of B in each. The Chemistry and Algebra teachers may be asked for recommendations. To ensure that prospective AP students have adequate time to commit to this course, their course load and extracurricular involvement will be considered before they are accepted into the course.)
  • AP Calculus AB
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course is designed for those students who have shown high achievement in previous math courses and desire further training in advanced mathematics. It will prepare students for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam and college level mathematics equivalent to a first semester college-calculus course. The course will focus both on differential and integral calculus. The student is required to purchase a graphing calculator. See Calculus teacher for details. See AP courses policies in appendix. (Prerequisite: B- or better in Pre-Calculus and/or teacher recommendation.)
  • AP Chemistry
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course meets all the depth and rigor of freshman chemistry at the college level. Topics covered are the structure of atoms, ions and molecules, mass relationships, chemical reaction, gases, thermo chemistry, quantum theory, periodic relationships, bonding liquids and solids, kinetics, equilibrium, acids-base and solubility equilibrium, entropy, electrochemistry, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Students will further their skills and enhance understanding by work with corresponding labs and computer simulations. See AP courses policies in appendix. (Prerequisite: A minimum of a B in both Chemistry and Algebra II, and teacher (of those subjects) recommendation)
  • AP English
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E, M
    AP English Literature and Composition is open to carefully selected seniors who desire a course designed with the academic intensity of a freshman level college course. The AP English class engages students in critical analysis of literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as a variety of literary terms and devices and their function within the literary text. The rigor and intensity of this course will make significant demands on the students’ time and will stretch their critical thinking abilities. The student will participate in seminar discussions, create projects, give presentations, and lead teaching sessions. See AP courses policies in appendix. (Prerequisites: English 3; fulfillment of AP teacher’s requirements)
  • AP Psychology
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online AP Psychology is a college level course providing students an overview of the development of human behaviors and thoughts. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences. Psychology is a diverse social and biological science with multiple perspectives and interpretations.
  • AP Statistics
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    Online This course is designed to provide college-level instruction on the concepts and tools for working with data. Students collect and analyze data and draw conclusions based on real-world information. The course challenges students to explore patterns, think critically, use a variety of tools and methods, and report their findings and conclusions. Students must be in grade 11 or 12.
  • AP U.S. History
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course is an intensive, in-depth survey of U.S. History designed to prepare the student for the AP U.S. History Exam offered in May. There is a heavy emphasis upon independent research and frequent writing assignments. See AP courses policies in appendix. There will be a summer reading assignment that must be completed prior to final admission to the course. (Prerequisites: junior class status; recommendations from Social Studies and English Departments, based upon achievement in previous course work, motivation, and verbal and writing achievement scores on standardized tests. )
  • AP World History
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online AP World History covers the history of the world from 600 C.E. to the present with an introduction unit on the period before (covering around 8000 B.C.E. to 600 C.E.). The course emphasizes “patterns of change” and the connections between the various world cultures throughout the time period being studied. Students will gain an understanding of the global experiences of humanity and be able to apply that knowledge to their growth and development as “world citizens.” The class has two major goals: (1) to prepare students to be successful on the AP World History exam and (2) to provide students with an understanding on why the world developed the way it did.
  • Art Fundamentals
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Open to all students. This course provides students with working experience in several different areas of art including design, painting and drawing. Students will learn to express themselves, ideas and messages through their own original art pieces. Students will also learn about art history through the research of historical artists.
  • Audio Visual Technology 1
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Audio Visual Technology 1 is the place where students learn the basics of cinematography. The class is loaded with projects geared around the use of cameras, tripods, slides, jibs, lights, microphones, and software to make a number of short films. The students are challenged to look at many elements of making films from pre-production with script writing and storyboarding to filming to post-production that culminates in a finished movie. They discuss film styles and techniques that further their effectiveness with communicating to an audience. The class includes an all-night event where students watch and discuss films.
  • Audio Visual Technology 2
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Audio Visual Technology 2 builds on the skills and techniques learned in Media 1. Students are pushed further and explore a wide range of special effects performed with advanced camera techniques, lighting styles, and video compositing software. Students make a number of small films and follow the steps of filmmaking to further reinforce their skills. The class also covers a more in-depth look at film styles, structure, and genres. The class includes an all-night event where students watch films and discuss to apply concepts learned in class.
  • Biology
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    This introductory Biology course provides a foundational study of a wide range of biological concepts. The first semester is primarily focused on cellular biology (organelles, photosynthesis, respiration, protein synthesis) and genetics. The second semester focuses on origins and diversity of living things, ecology, and human body systems. This class is normally taken in 9th or 10th grade.
  • Chamber Music
    2 semesters/Alternate Days0.25 credit per semester, E
    Chamber Music is a full-year course open by audition to all intermediate and advanced students who play string, wind, and percussion instruments. Piano students may be considered for membership in the percussion section. Two major concerts and additional performances for school and community events are planned annually. Students will learn how to play in small ensembles with proper technique, balance, and phrasing. Music from the Baroque period to the present is studied. Members are expected to perform at all concerts. (Prerequisite: intermediate playing level and audition)
  • Chemistry
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E, M
    This course addresses the composition, structure, and reactions of matter. The major emphasis is on inorganic compounds. A laboratory is coordinated to enhance understanding. The theoretical basis of concepts and their applications to a variety of written problems will be the major focus of the course with somewhat less emphasis on the application of concepts to contemporary life. (Prerequisite: Biology, B in Algebra 1 or Physical Science.)
  • Computer Programming
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online God, our Creator, is the ultimate programmer. He made us in His image, giving us a longing to build, improve, beautify, and order. Computers are the most powerful tool the world has ever known, but how can you control the most powerful tool ever invented if you cannot speak its language? Computer Programming 1 is a two semester course which enables students to learn two modern programming languages: Python and Java. Python is covered in the first semester of the course and Java in the second. The course teaches programming using real-world, practical examples through the lens of a Biblical worldview. You will learn Python by controlling the motion and sensory capabilities of a robot. You will learn Java by manipulating graphics, images, and audio. Programming is easier than you think and perhaps best of all, you get to show what you know by choosing projects that are of interest to you. Major colleges and universities are now using this approach to teach introductory computer programming, so you will learn the skills necessary to tackle advanced work. (Prerequisites: None; Recommended Grade Levels: 9-12)
  • Contemporary World Affairs
    1 semester (Spring)0.5 credit per semester, E
    This one-semester elective course is structured to give students an understanding of contemporary world issues. The course emphasizes student research, speaking in front of and with peers, and communicating knowledge through writing. The topics discussed are fluid in nature, meaning the topics and the amount of coverage on the topics will fluctuate depending on what is current in the media.
  • Digital Photography: Image Design and Editing
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online Some sights have to be shared. In the digital photography and graphic design lessons, students are encouraged to reflect the creative nature of God through the use of photography. They begin by learning general photographic concepts. Then composition skills are added to photographs and image-editing techniques are practiced. Students learn how to use layers, crop images, color and lighting concepts, hue and saturation, and exposures and special effects. Graphic design, artistic elements, and software skills are taught while producing graphic images. The concept of design as a manner of visual communication and a reflection of God’s creative nature is carried throughout. Students build a portfolio of work and explore the fields of photography, graphic arts, advertising and illustration. (Prerequisites: none)
  • Drawing
    1 semester0.25 credit per semester, E

    This .25 art credit is offered after school for art lovers who have schedule conflicts during the regular school day. Students focus primarily on drawing skills, using a sketchbook for all assignments. Content covers the nine fundamentals of drawing, and assignments are customized to each student’s level of drawing skills. Media differs from piece to piece as students use pencils, charcoal, ink and colored pencils. Later in the course, students work on some painting skills, learning how to use watercolor and acrylic paints in different styles on paper and canvas.

  • Dual Credit Courses – Taylor University
    1 or 2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online Dual Credit courses are only open to students in grades 11 and 12. If a student is interested in one of these courses please see the counselor.
    • Principles of Marketing
    • Accounting Principles I
    • Accounting Principles II
    • Principles of Macroeconomics
    • Principles of Microeconomics
    • Explorations in Social Work
    • Social Welfare
    • Cultural Anthropology
    • Social Problems
    • Introduction to Criminal Justice
    • British Literature
    • American Literature
    • Educational Psychology
    • Introduction to Philosophy
    • Logic
    • Child Psychology
    • Lifespan Development
  • Economics
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online Economic decisions affect us every day of our lives. Understanding economics means thinking about how scarcity, or limited resources, requires us to make choices and evaluate one option against others. In this course, you will recognize examples of economics in your daily life. You will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect you and others. As you progress through the course, you will recognize that the costs and benefits of choices connect individuals and groups around the world. The purpose of this course is to help you become a smart consumer who understands the flow of an economy between individuals, businesses, governments, and the rest of the world.
  • English 1
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    The course allows a close reading of genres of Western literature. These readings serve as models of good writing and as subjects for students' own writing exercises. Students review grammar and enhance vocabulary as they read and write. They learn how to craft a strong thesis, write an essay to support it, and, in the process, study sentence and paragraph structure. Students practice revising and editing quality paragraphs in consultation with their teacher. They learn to use the resources available in the library and apply these skills as they write a short research paper. Oral activities include literature discussion and a speech to inform.
  • English 2
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    This course encourages the student to read, comprehend and analyze selected samples of a variety of genres of literature. Students write essays, building on the previous work as well as expanding into a variety of styles including expository to persuasive formats. Students also learn to develop a thesis statement based upon a significant literary work, and practice peer editing and revision of their own works within the writing process. Students will also participate in a variety of oral assignments. (Prerequisite: English 1)
  • English 3
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    This overview of American literature includes a brief study of the historical events affecting American literature and a study of various genres and selected novels by American authors. These readings serve as models of good writing for students' own writing exercises. Review of grammar and punctuation will be incorporated as needed. Students write a major term paper, developing their research skills in preparation for college research projects. Emphasis is placed on the expository, literary essay. Oral activities include discussions as well as speeches to inform and persuade. (Prerequisite: English 2) 
  • English 4
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    English 4, a college preparatory course for seniors, covers a historical survey of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the twentieth century. Students will engage in literary analysis and use the literature from several time periods as a springboard for both discussion and critical writing. Students will write a variety of essays which may include several of the following: persuasive, expository, narrative essays, college application essays, resumes, and a senior letter. Emphasis is placed on skills necessary for college, including writing, critical thinking, and oral presentations. Grammar review, vocabulary, and other lessons will be incorporated as needed. (Prerequisite: English 3)
  • Fitness
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, R
    This co-ed course includes a unit on aerobics and activities that lead to physical fitness. Emphasis is placed on developing lifelong positive habits. Normally taken in 9th Grade.
  • Forensic Science 2: More Secrets of the Dead
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online Examine the evidence! Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. While taking Forensics 2, students continue the discovery of order and design in Creation. Students will discover how the evidence can clearly uncover both evil intentions and godly pursuits. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. Students will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.
  • Forensic Science I: Secrets of the Dead
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online Justice must be served! Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensics 1 seeks to guide students into an understanding of God's desire for both justice and mercy as they investigate the order and design in Creation that enables crime scene investigation. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.
  • Foundations of Algebra
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    Foundations of Algebra is for students who are not ready for, or do not need, a fully-paced Algebra 1 course.  Topics are selected from the regular Algebra 1 course that are either fundamental or more applicable for students with learning needs. Topics covered may include the following: Real Number System (RN), Quantities (Q), Seeing Structure in Expressions (SSE), Creating Equations (CED), Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities in one variable (REI), Interpreting Functions (IF), Building Functions (BF), Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models (LE), Interpreting Categorical and Qualitative Data (ID), and Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions (IC). Students must have completed 8th grade math and have teacher recommendation with Learning Specialist approval. This course is offered every year.
  • Foundations of Faith and the Modern Mind
    1 semester (Fall)0.5 credit per semester, R
    What is a worldview and how does it relate to the major religions of the world? How does a Christian worldview compare to other major religions and systems of thought? The first portion of this fall semester senior class will focus on introducing students to the person of Christ and His teachings. Students will examine the concepts of reality, faith, and truth, followed by an introduction to the Christ-centered Theistic worldview. This introduction to Christian thinking will be followed by a comparison to other major worldviews. This course fulfills the senior year Worldview elective requirement. (Prerequisite: none)
  • Foundations of Faith I
    1 semester (Fall)0.5 credit per semester, R
    This fall semester class will focus on introducing students to the person of Christ and His teachings. Students will examine the concepts of reality, faith, and truth, followed by an introduction to the Christ-centered Theistic worldview as it compares to other major worldviews. Students will be challenged to apply the definitions of faith and truth through a personal examination of the claim that the Bible is God's collected book of inerrant revelation. Ultimately, the course will provide opportunity to understand the foundational teachings of Christ in light of the canon of Scripture. In the fall of 2016, this course is a requirement for all 9th, 10th, and 11th grade students in the first semester. (Prerequisite: None)
  • Foundations of Faith II
    1 semester (Spring)0.5 credit per semester, R
    This spring semester class explores more deeply the Foundations of Faith I course. It is a second-semester requirement for only 9th graders. (Prerequisite: Foundations of Faith I)
  • Geometry
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    This course in plane and solid geometry emphasizes inductive and deductive reasoning and their applications to geometric figures. Topics covered include reasoning, congruent and similar polygons, circles, and area and volume measurements. Scientific method, proofs and algebra will be heavily integrated throughout the course as well as a geometry-based computer drawing program. (Prerequisite: Algebra 1; 9th graders taking Geometry must have a grade of 80% or higher in Algebra 1.)
  • Global Business
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course acquaints students with the business and economic concepts they will need as wage earners, consumers, entrepreneurs, and citizens in a global market economy. Students will learn about corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and the people who create them. Instructional units include the How the Free Enterprise System Works, Management Skills Needed to be Successful, Government and its Relationship to Business, How Marketing Works in a Business, and Finance and Investments that Relate to Businesses. Videos, hands-on activities, and discussions teach students what it means to be involved in any type of business. This course is recommended for any student who is planning on a business or related major in college.
  • Government
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    This course focuses on the philosophical, legal and historic foundations and major institutions of government with special focus on the American state. Students are acquainted with the function of democracy in the Republic by an in-depth study of the three branches of US government, political activity, political parties, and political events. A project in current Asian Studies or about a student’s country of citizenship is also an important element in this course. (Prerequisite: U.S. History, senior class status)
  • Health
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, R
    This co-ed course aids high school students in the process of making decisions concerning many aspects of their own health. Facts and concepts are presented to help students understand themselves and those around them as they face various health problems and issues. This class earns a Health credit rather than a PE credit.
  • High School Choir
    2 semesters/Alternate Days0.25 credit per semester, E

    High School Choir is a full-year course open by audition to all intermediate and advanced vocal students. An exceptional pianist may also join as an accompanist. Two major concerts and additional performances for school and community events are planned annually. Music from the Renaissance to the present is studied. Students will apply music history and theory as they study various pieces. They will also develop their tone, technique, and musicianship. Members are expected to perform at all concerts. (Prerequisite: intermediate singing level and audition)

  • Independent Study
    1 or 2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    In exceptional cases, a student may be assigned to a teacher who will supervise advanced, independent reading and projects in an area of study that would not normally be available. A written proposal for the course must be written by the student, signed by the teacher and submitted to the counselor. The student will not be enrolled in the course until the counselor and principal approve the proposal.
  • Leadership and Discipleship
    1 semester (Spring)0.5 credit per semester, R
    This course combines the study of the gospel of Mark and the book of Acts to illustrate Christ’s principles for leading in the context of a small group of disciples and the principles of leadership in the early church. Students also study additional New Testament letters to identify how to lead themselves and others in the context of contemporary culture. Class discussion is centered on practicing the habits and skills needed to reflect Christ within our circles of influence. This course is a second-semester requirement for all sophomores. (Prerequisite: Foundations of Faith I)
  • Leadership in Social Justice and Christian Service
    1 semester (Spring)0.5 credit per semester, R
    This second-semester 11th grade course focuses on biblical leadership and discipleship as a foundation and inspiration for service outside the classroom, especially to those marginalized in society. Throughout the semester, students will both examine their own leadership strengths and investigate the needs of various marginalized people groups around the world, learning to advocate for the needs of others. Students are required to raise money for and participate in an extended class service trip. This course fulfills the 11th grade Service elective requirement in 2017. (Prerequisite: Foundations of Faith I)
  • Lifetime Sports
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, R
    In this co-ed course, students are introduced to and participate in sports activities that can be participated in throughout life (includes units on softball, golf, archery, and Frisbee games, etc.). Normally taken in 9th Grade.
  • Mandarin 1
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course introduces the Mandarin Chinese language. Students will learn to use phonetic symbols to express themselves in written form. Students will be trained in the writing and reading of 60 Chinese characters and 20 radicals in this course. Besides characters, students will learn roughly 1000 vocabulary words and 50 sentence patterns and be introduced to topics on Chinese culture. The main resource selected for this course is Chinese Made Easier Book 1 and Discovering Chinese 1&2. (Prerequisite: Only students with minimal or no Mandarin ability will be allowed to take this class.)
  • Mandarin 2
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course emphasizes speaking and listening comprehension. Students should be fluent in basic daily conversation upon entering this course. Students will be trained in the writing and reading of 120 Chinese characters in this course. Besides characters, students will learn roughly 700 vocabulary words and 30 some sentence patterns and be introduced to topics on Chinese culture. The main resource selected for this course is Chinese Made Easier Book 2 and Discovering Chinese 3&4. (Prerequisite: Mandarin 1 or teacher approval)
  • Marketing
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course acquaints students with basic marketing concepts. At the end of the course, students will understand how a product goes from the pre-production stage to promotion and finally to distribution as they create their own product to price and promote to their peers. Units presented include: The Marketing Plan, Business/ Social Responsibility, Pricing Strategies, Promotional Concepts and Strategies, Product/Brand Management, and Market Research. Videos, online activities and simulations, hands-on activities and discussions teach students what it means to be involved in the marketing process.
  • Mobile App Programming
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online This course will teach foundational computer science methodology, concepts, and programming while students utilize the latest mobile development software and technologies to demonstrate their understanding. From the first lesson students will utilize what they are learning to develop and produce functional Android applications that they can share with classmates, family, and friends. Lessons are a mix of dynamic activity, video guidance, lecture, and tutorials. The lessons are designed to engage both the novice and expert student in the field of mobile application development. Note: The course was developed utilizing the Nexus 7 Android tablet. It is strongly recommended that students have access to this tablet in order for tutorials, video, and screenshots to align. Note: The course was developed utilizing the Nexus 7 Android tablet. It is strongly recommended that students have access to this tablet in order for tutorials, video, and screenshots to align. (Prerequisites: None; Recommended Grade Levels: 9-12)
  • Mosaics and Pottery
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Beginning to advanced students will learn to make mosaics with a variety of mediums. Students will make three to four different kinds of mosaics. Students will learn the historical and cultural background of mosaics. Students will learn to make various pottery pieces using several basic techniques such as pinch, slab, coil and wheel. Each student will take home several original pieces of pottery that have been glazed and fired. Students will also understand the historical and cultural background of pottery in Taiwan and other countries.
  • Painting
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Painting is a course for beginning to intermediate students. Students learn to use a common process for painting, including the use of solvents, paints, brushes and canvas. Students complete six or more paintings on various themes or subjects. Emphasis is on the use of painting to create visually interesting paintings that will communicate ideas, emotions, themes or messages. Students also learn about well-known historical and contemporary painters.
  • Peer Tutor
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Students interested in peer teaching may elect to join the peer-tutoring program. Seminars are held at the beginning of the year focusing on effective one-on-one teaching skills and methods. Students earn .25 credits for every 32 hours of service. (Prerequisite: teacher & counselor invitation)
  • Physical Science
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E, M
    This course is an introduction to major concepts of chemistry and physics. Content is applied to a variety of laboratory activities that focus on practical applications of the scientific method and exploration of the laws by which the natural world operates. This course serves as a stepping stone to Chemistry for those students not interested in taking Chemistry immediately after Biology.
  • Physics
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course studies force and motion, work and energy, electricity and magnetism, wave motions, sound and light, and electronics. A strong background in Algebra 1 and a good knowledge of Geometry and Right Triangle Trigonometry is assumed. This course is designed for 11th and 12th grade students. (Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra 2)
  • Pre-Calculus
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, M
    This course prepares students to enter college mathematics by introducing them to probability and statistics and grounding them in pre-calculus concepts. This course is strongly recommended for students who anticipate entering a science, engineering or pre-medical program. The topics of emphasis include functions and their graphs, trigonometry, exponents, logarithms, polar coordinates, probability, matrices, and introduction to limits. (Prerequisites: Geometry and a grade of B- (80%) or above in Algebra 2 or teacher recommendation)
  • Private Music Lessons
    1 semester at a time.00 credit per semester, E
    Private lessons are offered to students who are members of our high school performing ensembles (choral and instrumental classes). Lessons are available for piano, classical guitar, voice, organ and any band or string instrument. Lessons are generally 30 minutes in length (advanced students may sign up for a 45 or 60 minute lesson). All private music students are expected to perform in solo classes (mini-recitals). Exceptional senior students may be invited to perform in the senior recital.
    • All lessons are contingent upon availability of teachers.
    • Piano and classical guitar lessons are open to all students. Organ lessons are offered to piano students who are at an upper intermediate level.
    • Voice Class is offered to first year voice students in grades 10-12 who have completed one year in a high school choir. Private lessons are offered to second and third year voice students who have completed Voice Class.
    • Because of staff limitations, beginning lessons on band and orchestra instruments may not be available to high school students. Students who already play an instrument are encouraged to continue their studies.
    • A formal grade is not given, however private lessons taught at Morrison will be recorded on the student’s high school transcript.
    • Financial arrangements for private lessons are in addition to regular school tuition. Some students will be required to purchase their own music (voice, guitar, and some piano and string lessons). Early registration is recommended since teachers can only accept a limited number of students.
  • Psychology
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Online The human brain is fascinating. Where do thoughts and memories come from? What are emotions? And why do we behave the way we do? Above all, how do these factors influence our relationships with others? In Psychology I, you will begin to understand the human mind by exploring the research and theories of some of the most brilliant psychologists throughout history. Learn how psychology influences personality and development throughout the entire human lifespan, even from birth. Explore different psychological disorders and how they are treated according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder. And learn psychological tips that you can use every day, like how to cope and reduce stress. So, are you ready to unlock the mysteries of the human brain?
  • Senior Topics
    1 semester (Spring)0.5 credit per semester, E
    This 12th grade course prepares seniors for the imminent transitions and issues that they will face in the coming year as they leave Morrison and Taiwan. A variety of outside speakers will present topics that are relevant to the transition process and guidelines for implementation will be given. The book of Proverbs and other selected Bible sections will be used. Students will be required to write and defend a Good Life paper which will describe what the student believes is important in life. All seniors will take this course.
  • Spanish 1
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course introduces students to Spanish culture and language around the world. Students learn grammatical structures as they acquire basic vocabulary through themed units. Avancemos 1 provides teaching materials such as Internet-based activities, practice workbooks, and Spanish recordings to practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Special projects and hands-on activities such as the “Festival de Comida Hispana” engage students' in experiential learning, while providing an authentic audience for student work.
  • Spanish 2
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course builds on Spanish 1 with an emphasis on improving grammatical skills and knowledge of Spanish culture and history. Avancemos 2 structures almost all activities for pair or group interaction. Students find themselves active participants in every lesson, every day. Projects are regularly incorporated into units to assess the student’s ability to use what they have learned and to allow them to demonstrate their understanding of related aspects of Hispanic cultures. (Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or teacher approval)
  • Spanish 3
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course builds on Spanish 2 with an emphasis on improving grammatical skills and expanding vocabulary through increasing contact with authentic Hispanic literature and resources. The course also seeks to advance students’ historical and cultural knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. Avancemos 3 reviews core content from Level 1 and 2 before students move on to more advanced language skills. Students will participate in a variety of projects using internet research and multi-media presentations to share what they learn with their classmates. (Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or teacher approval)
  • Speech
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course is designed to provide students with the confidence and experience they need to perform well in the public speaking situations that they will face throughout college and beyond. Emphasis is on developing skills in various speech types: informative, persuasive, group presentation and special occasion speaking. Students sharpen their skills with the aid of videotape, texts of famous speeches, and interactive group activities. (Grades 11 and 12)
  • Student Aide
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E
    Student will aid a teacher, secretary or other staff member in his/her work. Potential activities include preparing bulletin boards, working with individual students, tutoring, office work, library work, etc. This is a Pass/Fail course.
  • U.S. History
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    This course analyzes the forces that shaped the birth and growth of the American nation to its position as a world leader. Study begins with the new nation; strong emphasis is placed upon the 20th century. May be replaced by AP U.S. History. (Prerequisite: junior class status) Note: It is possible for non U.S. citizens to substitute this course with a history course of their passport country that is taken from a recognized educational institution in their passport country. To do this requires counselor and principal approval. 
  • Weight Training
    1 semester0.5 credit per semester, E, M
    This co-ed course involves students in the proper use of weight training machines and a variety of regimen. Emphasis will be on learning the vocabulary and techniques of weight training. (Prerequisite: 10-12 grade student) 
  • World History
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, R
    This course offers a brief review of history from Ancient Greece up until the Age of Exploration (About 9 weeks), followed by in-depth study of world civilizations from 1600 up until the present day. Common themes in the human story will be used to tie together the various eras of history. (Prerequisite: This course is designated for 9th graders.)
  • Yearbook
    2 semesters0.5 credit per semester, E
    This course develops and enhances the skills necessary for the production of a quality high school yearbook. These skills include interviewing, journalistic writing, photography, computer layout (including topics related to graphic design, desktop publishing, typographical terminology, etc.), the setting and meeting of short and long-term goals, photography, the selling of advertising and the promotion of the yearbook. This is a year- long course. Participation for only one semester is discouraged and requires instructor permission. Students are encouraged to take this course multiple years as leadership positions generally go to those with experience.